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Regional Map / Napa River

Lower Napa River

Lower Napa River Watershed

The lower Napa River area extends from downstream of Yountville to the Highway 37 bridge over the Napa River estuary. This area includes the City of Napa and the Napa salt ponds. Tributaries include: lower Hopper, Dry, Soda, Milliken, Sarco, Redwood, Pickle Canyon, Carneros, Tulocay, Murphy, Kreuse, Suscol, Huichica, and Sheehy Creeks, and the Fagan and North Sloughs.

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The City of Napa developed along the tidal portion of the Napa River to facilitate shipping of agricultural products to San Francisco and the gold fields
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Original Trancas Ave. bridge
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Lower Napa River in the 1800s

A major flood control project is underway on the lower Napa River
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City of Napa 1905 flood
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City of Napa 1940 flood
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City of Napa 2006 flood
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Hilly Mt. Veeder hosts coniferous forest, vineyards, and views
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Lower Napa River
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The Carneros region encompasses a large area, including the Carneros and Huichica Creek watersheds
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The Napa State Hospital was built in 1872 and once included a working farm and cattle ranch
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Vineyards east of Napa City in the Coombsville area
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Certified Sites:


Enrolled Sites:


Certified Sites:

Beaulieu Vineyards (BV)
Beaulieu (Beautiful Place) Vineyards was founded by George de Latour in Rutherford in 1900. In 2007, Beaulieu Vineyards’ parent company, Diageo Chateau and Estate Wines, received an award from Friends of the River recognizing Exceptional Actions and Dedication to Environmental Conservation. Visit www.bvwines.com.

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Beaulieu Vineyards # 5
BV5 is a 121-acre site in the Carneros region. As part of their farm plan, they will evaluate the effectiveness of a non-toxic replacement for the copper sulfate algaecide in their reservoir, and they will work on a project to eradicate invasive plants and revegetate with native plants along Huichica Creek.

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Beringer Vineyards
Brothers Jacob and Frederick started Beringer Vineyards in 1876 in St. Helena, where the Beringer Rhine House still stands. Beginning in 2004, Beringer Vineyards made a commitment to enroll and certify all of their lands in Sonoma and Napa counties in the Fish Friendly Farming Program. In 2007, Beringer and its parent company Fosters Wine Estates Americas received an award from Friends of the River for Exceptional Actions and Dedication to Environmental Conservation. Visit www.beringer.com.

Abbotts Vineyard
This small, 21-acre site is managed to conserve soil and reduce runoff.

Big Ranch
This 321-acre site borders the Napa River. In this reach of the river downstream of the Oak Knoll Ave. bridge, the river has adjusted form through the entrenchment process and is deep and wide. From the vineyard on the former floodplain, the river channel has dropped more than 30 feet and has steep vertical banks. This wide channel area has a willow-filled floodplain. The vineyard is now on a terrace with live oaks along the riparian boundary. Beringer manages this site to reduce water use and conserve soil.

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Napa River adjacent to Big Ranch

Stanly Ranch
This 225-acre site encompasses rolling hills and small creeks at the edge of the Napa marshes. Beringer manages Stanly Ranch to minimize chemical use and water, and to conserve soil.

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Bouchaine Vineyards
Bouchaine Vineyards is the oldest vineyard area in the Carneros region, having been planted in 1927 by Boon Fly. Bouchaine Vineyards was established in 1981 by Gerret and Tatiana Copeland. Visit www.bouchaine.com.

Carneros Vineyards
This 87-acre site surrounds the winery and is carefully managed with cover crops and road improvements to protect soil and water quality.

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Bouchaine Vineyards’ Carneros Vineyards

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Charles Krug Winery
The Charles Krug Winery, built in 1961, was the first winery in Napa Valley. Since 1943 it has been operated by the Mondavi family. Visit www.charleskrug.com.

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Peter Mondavi has run the
Charles Krug Winery since 1966

Willow Lake Vineyard
This 169-acre site in the Carneros Creek watershed is managed using organic methods. A revegetation project was implemented on an un-named tributary creek on this site.

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Native plant revegetation of ephemeral creek
channel at Willow Lake Vineyard

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Clos Pegase Winery—Mitsuko’s Vineyard
Clos Pegase was established in 1980 by Jan and Mitsuko Shrem. Mitsuko’s Vineyard, a large 365-acre site, borders Carneros Creek and is a participant in the Carneros Creek Adaptive Management Plan. Visit www.clospegase.com.

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Native plants along Carneros Creek

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Cuvaison Estate Wines
Cuvaison Estate Wines were established in 1969 in Calistoga. Visit www.cuvaison.com.

Carneros Estate Vineyard
This 400-acre vineyard borders Carneros Creek and is managed to protect soils from erosion. This site is a participant in the Carneros Creek Adaptive Management Plan.

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Carneros Creek

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D’Adamo Vineyard
In 1982, the Piña brothers planted the D’Adamo site on the foothills of Atlas Peak. The 20-acre site is farmed with no-till practices and a cover crop of bell beans, vetch, and barley to protect and enrich the soil. Visit www.pinanapavalley.com.

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Barley cover crop

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Etude Wines
Founder Tony Suter started Etude Wines in 1984. Visit www.etudewines.com.

Etude Estate Vineyard
This 11-acre vineyard adjacent to the winery borders several wetlands and uses careful soil conservation practices to protect water quality. Etude Wines recently installed native plants to revegetate a natural slough on the site.

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Natural vegetation in slough channel

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Green Island Vineyard
This 165-acre site is located in American Canyon adjacent to the Napa salt evaporation ponds. Salt marshes and salt flats border the vineyards and are used by a number of birds.

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Green Island Vineyard helps to create habitat for burrowing owls

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Hagafen Cellars
This winery was founded by Irit and Ernie Weir in 1979. Visit www.hagafen.com.

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Hagafen Cellars

Rancho Wieruszowski 2
This 12-acre site surrounds the winery and is managed to reduce runoff and use very low chemical inputs.

Rancho Wieruszowski 3
This 9-acre site uses dense cover crops to protect soil, and also uses very small amounts of water.

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Hall Wines
This St. Helena winery was started by Kathryn and Craig Hall on the site of the 1885 Bergfield winery. Visit www.hallwines.com.

Napa River Ranch
This 223-acre site is dissected by numerous waterways: the Napa River, Dry Creek, Hopper Creek, and several un-named streams. The 185 acres of vineyards are managed for low water use and for soil conservation. A major restoration project was completed in 2008 on Dry Creek. In 2007, Hall Wines was given a Fish Friendly Farming award for Outstanding Efforts in Stream Habitat Improvement and Restoration, in recognition of the work done to remove a fish barrier on Dry Creek.

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Planting willow sprigs in Dry Creek as part of dam removal project

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Huichica Creek Vineyard
This vineyard is managed by Dave Steiner of the Napa County Resource Conservation District as a long-term demonstration project to educate the public about the benefits of low-input farming practices. The site includes a large wetland and tidal creek. Visit www.naparcd.org.

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Lower Huichica Creek

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Joseph Phelps Vineyards
Joseph Phelps Vineyards was founded in 1972 by Joe Phelps. Visit www.jpvwines.com.

Yountville Ranch
The Yountville Ranch is a 48-acre site with a cover crop of fescues, clover, chickweed, chamomile and other grasses on the vineyard avenues to reduce soil erosion. Biodynamic farming methods are used at this site.

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Kari Flores Vineyard
Kari Flores runs Crazy Flower Wines, a small wine label using grapes grown in the Kari Flores Vineyard. The ½-acre vineyard uses organic and biodynamic farming practices and is farmed entirely by hand. Owner Flores also breeds Olde English Babydoll sheep, a breed popular for natural weed control. Visit www.crazyflowerwines.com

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Kari Flores Vineyard

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Low Vineyards
Low Vineyards is a 15-acre relatively flat site situated in the Dry Creek watershed on the western side of Napa Valley. As part of their farm plan, the vineyard managers have reduced erosion along their ditches and prevent sediment delivery by planting strips of grass and revegetating the banks with shrubs and oaks.

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Merryvale Vineyards
The Schlatter family operates the Merryvale Winery. Visit www.merryvale.com.

Starmont Stanly Lane
This 76-acre site borders fresh and tidal wetland along the Napa River Estuary. Vineyards and roads are carefully managed to protect water quality.

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Brackish marsh in Napa Estuary at sunset

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Page Nord Vineyard
This 105-acre site borders lower Dry Creek. Jon Kanagy manages the 86 acres of vineyard using no-till practices, and has planted willow and other riparian plants along the creek. Visit www.pagenordvineyards.com.

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Dry Creek adjacent to Page Nord Vineyard

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Robert Sinskey Vineyards
This winery was among the first to use all organically grown grapes. In 2007, the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance recognized Robert Sinskey Vineyards with an award for Excellence in Water Quality Improvement and Protection. Visit www.robertsinskey.com.

Capa Vineyard
This 16-acre site contains 9 acres of vineyard. Organic practices and cover crops are used to protect fragile soils.

Three Amigos Vineyard
This 71-acre site in the Carneros region has 51 acres of vineyard and is managed for soil and water conservation.

Vandal Vineyard
This 50-acre vineyard, like most of the Sinskey vineyards, uses babydoll sheep to trim cover crops, reducing their use of fossil fuels.

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OSR Vineyard
This 27-acre vineyard uses organic growing methods.

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Saintsbury Winery
Dick Ward and David Graves established this winery in the Carneros area in 1981. In 2007, Saintsbury Winery was recognized by the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance for Excellence in Water Quality Improvement and Protection. Visit www.saintsbury.com.

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The Carneros region has gentle rolling hills

Home Ranch
This 12-acre vineyard surrounds the winery and covers gently rolling hills. The vineyard is farmed using low-input methods.

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Cover crop in vineyard during autumn

Brown Ranch
This 40-acre site has a 29-acre vineyard which uses cover crops and low amounts of chemicals to protect water quality.

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Segassia Vineyards
Jim Tomlinson manages this 4-acre vineyard on Mt. Veeder using cover crops and drainage improvements to protect water quality. Redwood forest on the site shades a year-round creek.

Insert redwoodcreek photo with caption: Redwood Creek is a major tributary of the Mt. Veeder area

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Silverado Vineyards
Silverado Vineyards was founded by the Miller family in the 1970s with a winery, built in 1981. In 2007, Silverado Vineyards was recognized by the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance for Excellence in Water Quality Improvement and Protection. Visit www.silveradovineyards.com.

Mt. George Vineyard
This 167-acre vineyard on the lower slopes of Mt. George includes numerous small creeks which have been revegetated with native plants.

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Mt. George

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Trefethen Family Vineyards
In 1968, Gene and Katie Trefethen purchased and restored the historic Eschol winery, built in 1886 by Hamden McIntyre. Visit www.trefethen.com.

Main Ranch
This 578-acre site extends along Highway 29 and borders Dry Creek, where a revegetation project was recently completed.

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Trefethen Main Ranch vineyard

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V. Sattui Winery
This family-owned winery was founded in 1885. Visit www.vsattui.com.

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Henry Road Ranch
This 525-acre site in the Carneros area borders on Carneros Creek. This site is participating in the Carneros Creek Adaptive Management Plan. In 2007, the California Land Stewardship Institute recognized V. Sattui’s Henry Road Ranch with an award for Light Touch Vineyard Development and Operation.

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Silt fence installed to protect creek during vineyard development

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White Rock Vineyards
The Vandendriessche family owns this 64-acre site near Soda Canyon Creek and planted the 36-acre White Rock Vineyard in 1979. This site was first developed in 1870 and the original stone winery still stands on the site. White rock refers to the volcanic rock that underlies the vineyard. They practice minimal watering and fertilizing, have never used pesticides, and use individual hand-hoeing to avoid herbicides. As part of their farm plan, they are planting native species to improve a small creek corridor through the vineyard. Visit www.whiterockvineyards.com.

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Old rock wall near White Rock Vineyards

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Enrolled Sites:

Adastra Vineyards
This 20-acre site has been owned by the Thorpe Family since 1984. The ranch was used for Angus cattle until 1990 when the Thorpes planted grape vines. The vineyards are certified organic. Visit www.adastrawines.com.

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Artesa Vineyards and Winery—Carneros Vineyard
The Cordoníu Group of Spain established the Cordoníu Napa winery in 1991 and in 1997 expanded the winery and renamed it Artesa. Less than half of this 353-acre site is farmed as vineyard. Carneros Creek runs through the site and the managers have maintained the native vegetation on the creek. Coyotes can be seen roaming the 205 acres of wildland on the site. Visit www.artesawinery.com.

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Native snowberry in Carneros Creek riparian corridor

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Beaulieu Vineyards (BV)

Beaulieu Vineyard #8
The vineyard manager on this 81-acre site uses wind machines for frost control and also seeds vineyard roads and avenues with a barley cover crop in winter.

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Wind machine, used for frost control in spring, reduces water use

Beaulieu Vineyard #9
This 141-acre site in the Carneros region of Napa County uses wind machines for frost control in order to minimize water use. The vineyard manager is working to revegetate a small creek on the site.

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Live oak

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Beckstoffer Vineyards
Andy Beckstoffer came to Napa in the 1960s and bought his first vineyard in 1973. Visit www.beckstoffervineyards.com.

Las Amigas and Carneros Lake Vineyard
This 300-acre site encompasses low rolling hills and borders Huichica Creek. Cover crops are used to protect soil and chemicals are limited to protect water quality.

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Charles Krug Winery

Page Vineyard and Homefinders Vineyard
This 30-acre site lies on the fertile Napa Valley floodplain, where the Napa River once ran through multiple braided channels, depositing a rich silt loam ideal for agriculture. Charles Krug Winery has been farming this site since 1971.

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Clos du Val Winery—Carneros Vineyard
In 1973, Clos du Val Winery acquired this 180-acre site in the Carneros District. Vineyard manager Al Wagner uses sustainable agricultural practices and has re-aligned some vineyard rows to improve drainage and eliminate an erosion problem. They have worked with the Natural Resources Conservation Service on a restoration project on Buhman Creek to address bank erosion with plantings and revetments. Visit www.closduval.com.

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Box elder, a native riparian tree

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Cuvaison Estate Wines
Cuvaison Estate Wines were established in 1969 in Calistoga. Visit www.cuvaison.com.

Mt. Veeder Estate Vineyard
This historic 130-acre site lies on the rocky slopes of Mt. Veeder. Only 48 acres are planted to vineyard, including dry-farmed zinfandel vines planted in 1926 by the Brandlin family.

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Mt. Veeder region

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Domaine Chandon Winery
Domaine Chandon was established in 1973 as part of Moët-Hennessy, the French company that produces Dom Pérignon champagne, named for the Benedictine monk who created the traditional method of making champagne. Visit www.chandon.com.

Mt. Veeder Vineyard
This 200-acre site on the slopes of Mt. Veeder includes 100 acres of vineyard separated by wooded creek canyons. Erosion control is a central focus of site management.

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Domaine Chandon vineyard on Mt. Veeder

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Duckhorn Wine Company
Duckhorn Wine Company was founded in 1976 by Dan and Margaret Duckhorn. Visit www.duckhorn.com.

Corktree Vineyard
This 20-acre site on the eastern side of Napa Valley is named after a 75-year old cork oak growing in the middle of the vineyards. The vines are set back from the small creek that runs through the edge of the property. Visit www.duckhorn.com.

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Hudson Vineyards
This nearly 2,000-acre site is largely wildland with two vineyard areas of 180 acres. Vineyards are located near a tributary to Huichica Creek and along Carneros Creek, and are managed to protect soils and use low levels of water and chemicals. This site is participating in the Carneros Creek Adaptive Management Plan. Visit www.hudsonvineyards.com.

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Oak revegetation project on hillside at Hudson Vineyards

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Premier Pacific Vineyards—Suscol Bench/Sugarloaf Mountain Vineyard
Suscol Creek flows through a portion of this 320-acre site on the southeast side of the lower Napa River watershed. Visit www.ppvco.com.

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Rancho Carneros
Zach Berkowitz, long-time Napa grape grower, owns and farms this flat site in the Carneros district. The vineyard is managed to minimize soil erosion.

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Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars
Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars was founded in 1970 by well-known winemaker Warren Winiarski. Visit www.cask23.com.

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Big Ranch Road Vineyard
This 32-acre ranch is near the Napa River. Erosion risk is reduced by using only one access road year-round and winterizing seasonal roads. Visit www.cask23.com.

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The Hess Collection
Donald Hess acquired his land on Mt. Veeder in 1978. Visit www.hesscollection.com.

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Crest/Summit
This 150-acre vineyard is near the summit of Mt. Veeder and includes 125 acres of vineyard separated by forested wildlife corridors.

Veeder Hills
This large site on Mt. Veeder includes 135 acres on the ridgetop, surrounded by forest and chaparral. A portion of the vineyards were formerly part of the Mont LaSalle Vineyards & Winery, one of the first wineries in the Mt. Veeder area.

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Tournesol Wines – Estate Vineyards
These two small vineyards bridge the land between Witwether Creek and Murphy Creek near the eastern border of Napa County. Owners Bob and Anne Arns use wind machines for frost control to minimize their use of water. Visit www.tournesolwine.com.

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Trefethen Family Vineyards

Hillside Ranch
This 216-acre site has 42 acres of vineyard. An un-named, seasonal creek on the site will be revegetated as part of the farm plan.

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California bay laurel is a native tree that often grows near creeks

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Vichy Springs Ranch
The Hall family has lived on and farmed this 7-acre site since 1947. Currently the family farms only 2 acres of the property with minimal pesticide use, and is allowing native oak re-growth along Sarco Creek.

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William Hill Estate – Silverado Bench Vineyard
This 140-acre vineyard surrounds the winery as well as several lakes. Visit www.williamhillwinery.com.

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Wine grapes use the lowest amount of irrigation
water of any agricultural crop in California

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