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Regional Map / Napa River

Middle Napa River

Middle Napa Map

The Middle Napa River watershed extends from just north of St. Helena to just south of the town of Yountville and includes the watershed drained by Conn Creek. Tributary creeks of the Middle Napa area include: York, Sulphur, Bear Canyon/ Bale Slough, Conn, Chiles, Moore, Sage, Rector, Chase, and upper Hopper Creeks.

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View of Lake Hennessey, the largest
reservoir in the Napa River drainage, and east side of the watershed
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Chiles Valley hillside. Chiles Valley is a small valley which parallels the Napa Valley
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George Yount, the first American settler in the valley, moved to Napa Valley in 1831
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The Yountville Veterans’ Home was completed circa 1883
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Middle Napa Valley
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Christian Brothers Winery in 1962 is now the California Culinary Institute
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Historic winery
Inns
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Napa River in springtime
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Jacob and Frederick Beringer built a winery in St. Helena in 1877

 

Certified sites:

 

Enrolled Sites:

 


Certified Sites:

Beckstoffer Vineyards
Andy Beckstoffer came to Napa in the 1960s and bought his first vineyard in 1973. Visit www.beckstoffervineyards.com.

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Andy Beckstoffer

George III Vineyard
This 330-acre site borders Silverado Trail and Conn Creek and uses extensive water conservation measures.

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Beaulieu Vineyards (BV)
Beaulieu (Beautiful Place) Vineyards was founded by Georges de Latour in Rutherford in 1900. In 2007, Beaulieu Vineyards’ parent company, Diageo Chateau and Estate Wines, received an award from Friends of the River recognizing Exceptional Actions and Dedication to Environmental Conservation. Visit www.bvwines.com.

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The first Beaulieu Vineyards winery

Beaulieu Vineyard #1
This is the original BV vineyard and lies on the alluvial fan of Bear Canyon Creek. As part of the farm plan for this site, invasive, non-native Arundo donax (giant reed) was removed in 2008 with native oaks and other plants installed in 2009.

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These stands of Arundo were removed in 2008.

Beaulieu Vineyard #2
The managers of Beaulieu Vineyards are working with FFF program staff to plant native oaks along the small creek on this flat, 125-acre property. A thick cover crop over avenues and vineyard roads is maintained throughout the winter to minimize soil erosion.

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The second BV vineyard

Beaulieu Vineyard #10
This 120-acre site stretches west from the Napa River and includes Bale Slough and large valley oaks and densely wooded riparian corridors. The owners, Diageo Chateau and Estate Wines, are working with the FFF program to remove Arundo donax and revegetate with native plants along Bale Slough. The Napa River on this site is part of the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration Project.

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Vineyards are set well away from even small
waterways to protect water quality.

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Beringer Vineyards
Brothers Jacob and Frederick started Beringer Vineyards in 1876 in St. Helena, where the Beringer Rhine House still stands. Beginning in 2004, Beringer Vineyards made a commitment to enroll and certify all of their lands in Sonoma and Napa counties in the Fish Friendly Farming Program. In 2007, Beringer and its parent company Fosters Wine Estates Americas received an award from Friends of the River for Exceptional Actions and Dedication to Environmental Conservation. Visit www.beringer.com.

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Beringer Rhine House in 1890

Dos Rios Vineyard
The 96-acre Dos Rios Vineyard borders Conn Creek. In conjunction with the FFF program, Beringer Vineyards has removed invasive plants from the riparian corridor of Conn Creek.

Gamble Ranch
This 900-acre site has a large number of waterways: Conn Creek, Rector Creek, Napa River, and several unnamed creeks. Large valley oaks dot the site, providing habitat for numerous birds. Working with the FFF program, Beringer Vineyards has eradicated invasive non-native tree-of-heaven, eucalyptus, Himalayan blackberry, and Arundo on the site’s creeks. These invasive plants do not provide a high level of wildlife habitat, and once removed, native oaks, maples, California walnut, Oregon ash, and California bay laurel were planted. In 2007 Beringer was given a Fish Friendly Farming award for Outstanding Efforts in Stream Habitat Improvement and Restoration.

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Conn Creek on the Gamble Ranch
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Large trees line a small waterway on the Gamble Ranch
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Rector Creek fan is naturally dry in the spring,
summer, and fall

 

Marston Ranch
Located near the top of the Sulphur Creek watershed, this site has 33 acres of vineyard. The surrounding lands are coniferous forest stretching from the ridgetop down to the south fork of Sulphur Creek. As part of their farm plan, Beringer Vineyards has completed storm-proofing of a number of dirt roads on the site.

St. Helena Home Ranch
This 95-acre site includes the historic Beringer Rhine House and wine caves, as well as the modern winery and 49 acres of vineyard. York Creek flows through the site.

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York Creek during a small flood
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York Creek has year-round flow and supports rearing habitat for steelhead trout in its upstream reaches

 

Steinhauer Ranch
This ranch, named for the longtime vice-president of Beringer’s vineyard operations, Bob Steinhauer, has 37 acres of vineyard, surrounded by pines and manzanita. Dry conditions require a high level of water conservation on the site.

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Grey pines are common on the eastern
side of the Napa River watershed

Yountville Vineyard
This 300-acre site borders the Napa River and contains a number of unnamed waterways. These smaller channels were revegetated with grasses to protect water quality. This site is a participant in the Oakville to Oak

Knoll Napa River Restoration Plan.

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Cain Vineyards and Winery
Situated near the top of the Sulphur Creek watershed, Cain Vineyards encompasses 685 acres of terraced vineyards, planted in the 1980s, and a large area of wildlife habitat. Vineyards are carefully managed with cover crops to protect soil and only small volumes of water are used for irrigation. As part of their farm plan, general manager Chris Howell is participating in a road storm-proofing project to improve fish habitat in Sulphur Creek. Visit www.cainfive.com.

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Cain Vineyards
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Dense grass cover protects terraces from erosion

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Cakebread Cellars
Cakebread Cellars was started by Jack Cakebread in the early 1970s in Rutherford. Visit www.cakebread.com.

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Rutherford Winery Ranch
This 62-acre site was the first vineyard purchased by the Cakebread family and is the location of their winery. The Napa River borders the site and will be restored as part of the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration Program.

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Napa River

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Charles Krug Winery
The Charles Krug Winery, built in 1961, was the first winery in Napa Valley. Since 1943 it has been operated by the Mondavi family. Visit www.charleskrug.com.

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Lincoln Ranch
This 92-acre site borders both Rector and Conn Creeks and is farmed organically. As part of their farm plan, Rector Creek was planted with natives in 2009 and invasive, non-native tree-of-heaven is being eradicated.

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Lincoln Ranch
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Rector Creek adjacent to Lincoln Ranch

 

Slinsen and Voltz Vineyards
These two contiguous vineyards sit at the base of the Maacamas Mountains on the western side of Napa Valley, and have been farmed by Charles Krug Winery since 1971. A small creek on this site transports large cobble typical of an alluvial fan stream.

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A row of flowers supports beneficial insects,
which control pest insects

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Chavez and Leeds Vineyard
This 37-acre site is managed by Frank Leeds as an organic, dry-farmed vineyard.

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Dry-farmed vineyard

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De Carle Vineyard
The 59-acre De Carle Vineyard is surrounded by waterways: Bear Canyon Creek, Bale Slough, and a freshwater wetland area. The reach of Bear Canyon Creek on this site had a large stand of invasive, non-native Arundo donax (giant reed). Beringer Vineyards worked with the FFF program to cut and treat the Arundo from 2008-2009. Native oaks and other trees will be installed in 2009-2010 with the help of the current landowners.
 

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Arundo
growing along creek, prior to cutting
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Pile of cut Arundo stems will be chipped or burned to prevent re-infestation

 

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Duckhorn Wine Company
Duckhorn Wine Company was founded in 1976 by Dan and Margaret Duckhorn. Visit www.duckhorn.com.

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Marlee’s Vineyard
This 10-acre site borders the Napa River where invasive, non-native Arundo donax is frequently removed. Vineyards are managed with cover crops and surround the winery and tasting room.

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Napa River adjacent to Marlee’s Vineyard

Patzimaro Vineyard
This 17-acre site is located along the western side of St. Helena. Sustainable methods are used to protect water quality and soil.

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Frog’s Leap Winery
This winery was founded in the 1980s by John Williams, a former dairy rancher from New York. The winery is located where frogs were once grown for gourmet restaurants in San Francisco. Visit www.frogsleap.com.

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Red Barn Ranch
This 38-acre vineyard surrounds the winery and uses organic and dry-farming techniques.

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Galleron Ranch
This ranch borders the Napa River and includes a wetland slough channel. This site is included in the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration program and is farmed using organic and dry-farming techniques.

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Slough channel on Galleron Ranch

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Heitz Wine Cellars
The Heitz family established Heitz Wine Cellars in 1961. Visit www.heitzcellar.com.

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Highway Vineyard
This 13-acre vineyard borders the winery on Highway 29 and is farmed using organic methods.

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Linda Falls Vineyard
This 42-acre site on Howell Mountain has only 7 acres of vineyard and a significant wildland area. No-till practices and organic growing methods are used.

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California walnut shows fall colors

Trailside Vineyard
This 101-acre site borders Conn Creek and is the site of a large revegetation project. Several acres of invasive, non-native eucalyptus were removed and treated, and a variety of native oaks and other plants were installed. The native oaks provide habitat for wildlife, most particularly birds. In 2007, Heitz Wine Cellars was given a Fish Friendly Farming award recognizing Outstanding Efforts in Stream Habitat Improvement and Restoration.

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Native live oak seedling grows after invasive,
non-native eucalyptus (trunk) is removed

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Joseph Phelps Vineyards
Joseph Phelps Vineyards was founded in 1972 by Joe Phelps. Visit www.jpvwines.com.

Banca Dorada
Banca Dorada is a flat 28-acre site where Joseph Phelps Vineyards cultivates alternate rows and keeps a cover crop of fescues, clover, oats, phacelia, chickweed, chamomile, and other grasses on their vineyard avenues to reduce soil erosion.

Barboza Vineyard
On this flat, 17-acre site, alternate rows are cultivated and a cover crop of fescues, clover, chickweed, chamomile, and other grasses are grown on the vineyard avenues to reduce soil erosion. As part of the farm plan, Joseph Phelps Vineyards is planting trees and shrubs along a drainage channel.

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Krupp Vineyard
During the 1800s, crops were grown in fields cleared from dense chamise, but were abandoned during Prohibition. The current vineyards were developed by the Krupp family in the 1990s. This 137-acre site sits in the headwaters of Rector Creek, upstream of the reservoir. The 123 acres of vineyard grow in the thin soils that overlie volcanic rock. Visit www.kruppbrothers.com.

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Red clover enriches vineyard soil and supports
beneficial insects

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Long Meadow Ranch-Rutherford Garden
This 6-acre site is an organic vegetable garden along Highway 29 in the middle of the Napa Valley. Visit www.longmeadowranch.com.

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Martha’s Vineyard
This prestigious site on the western side of Napa Valley is farmed organically and managed vine by vine. Owned by Tom and Martha May since 1963, the vineyard lies along Lincoln Creek, which is being managed to remove the invasive, non-native understory plants and replant with native rose and spicebush.

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Merryvale Vineyards
The Schlatter family operates the Merryvale Winery. Visit www.merryvale.com.

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Conn Valley Estate
This 68-acre site is managed for Merryvale by Remi Cohen with environmental sensitivity. In farming the complex landscape of Conn Valley, care has been taken to minimize erosion, sedimentation and runoff.

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Napa Valley Reserve
This 80-acre site includes vineyards, gardens, olive trees, and several waterways adjacent to the Meadowood Resort. Revegetation of Howell Creek and several un-named creeks will be completed as part of the farm plan. Visit www.thenapavalleyreserve.com.

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Napa Valley Reserve

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Neal Family Vineyards
Owner Mark Neal has been managing vineyards in the Napa Valley since 1968, first with his father Jack Neal, and then as owner of Jack Neal and Son, Inc. Neal Family Vineyards uses organic farming methods over most of its land. Visit www.nealvineyards.com.

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Owner Mark Neal

Neal Brothers Vineyard 1
This 12-acre site is a largely flat vineyard managed to limit chemical use and runoff.

Neal Family Vineyards III
This 7-acre site at the northern end of St. Helena is one of many small, flat vineyards distributed over the Napa Valley floor. Like other similar sites, it has no year-round roads or improved drainage, so rainfall drains naturally off the property.

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Opus One Winery
This site extends from the foothills to the Napa River and includes portions of Doak Creek. This area of the Napa River is included in the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration Project. Visit www.opusonewinery.com.

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Quarry Vineyard
The vineyards surround a historic white rock quarry on this 26-acre site along Silverado Trail. The first vineyards and winery were developed in the 1880s; the Crull family purchased the site in 1993. Invasive, non-native plants will be removed and the riparian corridor revegetated with native plants on an un-named, seasonal creek as part of the farm plan. Visit www.terraceswine.com.

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Robert Mondavi Winery
Robert Mondavi established his winery in 1966. He was a leader in bringing attention to the Napa Valley as a producer of world-class wine. Visit www.robertmondavi.com.

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To Kalon Vineyard
This 550-acre vineyard borders Doak and Lincoln Creeks. Vineyard managers Matt Ashby and Katie Taylor are working with the FFF program to eradicate invasive, non-native plants and revegetate with native trees and understory species.

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Spicebush, a riparian plant native to California
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Invasive Arundo donax will be removed and native plants installed in its place

 

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Robert Sinskey Vineyards
Robert Sinskey Vineyards was among the first to use all organically grown grapes in its wines. In 2007, the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance recognized Robert Sinskey Vineyards with an award for Excellence in Water Quality Improvement and Protection. Visit www.robertsinskey.com.

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SLD Vineyard
This terraced vineyard uses organic methods and cover crops to protect water quality.

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Silverado Vineyards
Silverado Vineyards was founded by the Miller family in the 1970s with a winery, built in 1981. In 2007, Silverado Vineyards was recognized by the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance for Excellence in Water Quality Improvement and Protection, for completing an erosion control project on an old abandoned road. Visit www.silveradovineyards.com.

Stags Leap Ranch
This 200-acre site along the Napa River installed a project in 2006 to repair erosion on an ephemeral creek which could affect water quality. Planting of native species has been completed along the riparian areas of the property. This site is part of the Oakville to Oak Knoll Napa River Restoration Plan.

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Silverado’s Stags Leap Ranch borders the Napa River

Miller Ranch
Hopper Creek crosses through this 95-acre site and was planted with native trees and grasses in 2006 as part of their farm plan implementation.

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Grass cover on drainage ditch protects soil from erosion

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Spottswoode Estate Vineyard and Winery
This winery was established in 1882 and named for Mrs. Albert Spotts who owned the site from 1910-1972. The Novak family purchased and restored the winery, mansion, and 37-acre vineyard in the 1970s. Grapes are farmed using organic methods. Visit www.spottswoode.com.

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Stags’ Leap Winery
This 141-acre site includes vineyards, wildlands, winery, and an historic country manor house built in the late 1800s. Vineyards have been farmed on the site since 1893. Chase Creek, named for the original owners of the property, courses through the vineyards. As part of the farm plan, Chase Creek will be revegetated with native plants. Visit www.stagsleap.com.

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Vineyard at Stags’ Leap Winery
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Willow in Chase Creek

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St. Supéry Vineyards & Winery
The Skalli family from France established the St. Supéry winery in the 1970s. Visit www.stsupery.com.

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Rutherford Estate Vineyard
This 35-acre vineyard surrounds the winery in Rutherford. This site is part of the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration project.

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Stagecoach Vineyards
During the 1800s, crops were grown in fields cleared from dense chamise on this site, but were abandoned during Prohibition. The current vineyards were developed in the 1990s. This site is close to 1200 acres with about 600 acres of vineyard situated on the volcanic plateau above the Rector Creek Canyon. As part of their farm plan, additional road storm-proofing will be completed. Visit www.stagecoachvineyard.com.

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Vineyard overlooking Rector Creek Canyon
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Stagecoach Vineyards

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Sutter Home Winery-Trinchero Family Estates
This winery was started in the late 1800s by John Thomann and was restored by the Trinchero family in 1948 and re-named Sutter Home. Visit www.sutterhome.com.

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Early picture of Sutter Home Winery

Zinfandel Lane Vineyard
This 29-acre vineyard surrounds the winery and extends to the Napa River where extensive restoration work has been done. This site is within the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration area.

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Riparian habitat on the Napa River
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Replanted snowberry, a native riparian understory plant

 

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Volker Eisele Estate Vineyards
This 430-acre site in Chiles Valley was developed in 1975 by Volker and Liesel Eisele with 60 acres of vineyards. The extensive wildlands are managed for wildlife habitat and native plants, and have been preserved through a conservation easement with the Land Trust of Napa County. The vineyards are managed using organic methods. In 2007, the California Land Stewardship Institute recognized Volker Eisele Estate Vineyards with an award for Light Touch Vineyard Development and Operation. Visit www.volkereiselefamilyestate.com.

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Grass covers roads and vineyard floor to protect water quality
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Native California bunchgrasses on the wildlands at Volker Eisele Estate

 

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Enrolled Sites:

Artesa Vineyards & Winery
The Codorníu Group of Spain established the Codorníu Napa winery in 1991 and in 1997 expanded the winery and renamed it Artesa. Visit www.artesawinery.com.

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Foss Valley Ranch
This ranch in Soda Canyon includes 88 acres of vineyard and riparian corridors to allow movement of wildlife.

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Beaulieu Vineyards (BV)

St. Helena Ranch
This 128-acre site borders the Napa River.

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Beringer Vineyards

Bancroft Ranch Vineyard
Located in the Howell Mountain area, this 150-acre site used to be the bottom of a reservoir and now produces one of Beringer’s highest rated Merlots. The site is managed to minimize water use and runoff.

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Chappellet Vineyards and Winery
The Chappellet family purchased a 640-acre ridgetop property along the dry eastern slopes of the Napa River watershed in the 1960s. Their 97 acres of vineyard are farmed organically using water- and soil-conserving techniques and biofuel-powered tractors. Visit www.chappellet.com.

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Chaparral and oak woodland blanket the extensive
wildlands on the Chappellet property.

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Domaine Chandon Winery
Domaine Chandon was established in 1973 as part of Moët-Hennessy, the French company that produces Dom Pérignon champagne, named for the Benedictine monk who created the traditional method of making champagne. Visit www.chandon.com.

Yountville Vineyards
This 442-acre site stretches from the western foothills to Highway 29 in Yountville and includes extensive wildland and the headwaters of Hopper Creek.

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Domain Chandon’s Yountville Vineyards

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Duckhorn Wine Company

Rector Creek Vineyard
This historic vineyard, once part of Yountville founder George C. Yount’s estate, has been a source of wine grapes for almost 100 years. The vineyard occupies the alluvial fan of Rector Creek where it emerges from the outlet of Rector Reservoir, moving large cobble and boulders typical of an alluvial fan. The owners are managing the site to revegetate the banks and allow a wide corridor for the creek.

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Rector Creek alluvial fan adjacent to
Paraduxx Winery and vineyard.

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Ehlers Estate
Ehlers Estate is operated by the Leducq Foundation which funds cardiovascular research. The vineyards on this 42-acre site are farmed with organic and biodynamic methods. Visit www.ehlersestate.com.

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Franciscan Vineyards Oakville Estate
This winery was started in 1975. The 216-acre site borders the Napa River and is participating in the Oakville to Oak Knoll Napa River Restoration plan. Visit www.franciscan.com.

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Dense riparian vegetation of the Napa River
bordering the Franciscan Oakville site.

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Frog’s Leap Winery

Gonzalez Ranch
This 11-acre site on the Napa River is being managed to minimize water use and soil erosion. Manager Frank Leeds has supervised the removal of invasive, non-native Arundo donax from the river banks, and is continuing to monitor and remove re-growth of this invasive plant. Visit www.frogsleap.com.

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Cut Arundo clump along the Napa River

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Gamble Family Vineyards
This 26-acre site borders Conn Creek. Long-time Napa landowner Tom Gamble has revegetated the banks of Conn Creek and uses sustainable farming techniques. Visit www.gamblefamilyvineyards.com.

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Conn Creek adjacent to Gamble
Family Vineyards

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Gargiulo Vineyards
Gargiulo Vineyards was founded in 1992 by Jeff Gargiulo. Visit www.gargiulovineyards.com.

575 OVX
This 10-acre site surrounds the winery on Oakville Crossroad and includes a south hillslope. Gargiulo Vineyards has farmed organically since 2000, including using cover crops and no-till practices to protect and enrich the soil.

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Money Road Ranch
Money Road Ranch is a 40-acre site adjacent to a tributary to the Napa River. Gargiulo Vineyards has farmed the 37 planted acres organically with cover crops since 1992. The berm between a tributary creek to the Napa River and the vineyard is planted with olive trees. Visit www.gargiulovineyards.com.

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Honig Vineyard and Winery
Michael Honig, whose family has owned the vineyard since 1964, is committed to sustainable practices on his 70-acre site. At the 52-acre vineyard, they use owl boxes for rodent control, bat and blue bird nesting boxes to encourage insect pest control, mechanical tilling rather than herbicides, biodiesel in their tractors, and drip irrigation for increased water efficiency. Along the vineyard edge on the levee, the winery has improved the riparian habitat with an extensive native plant restoration. In 2006, the winery invested in solar panels at one corner of the vineyard to generate the electricity they use. Visit www.honigwine.com

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Barn owls are encouraged near the vineyard to
control gophers.

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Long Meadow Ranch
This 616-acre ranch was established in 1872 and redeveloped in 1990. Organic grapes, olive oil, and grass-fed beef are produced by owner Ted Hall and manager Frank Leeds. Visit www.longmeadowranch.com.

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Neal Family Vineyards

Howell Mountain Estate
This 13-acre site encompasses a 4-acre vineyard and a winery.

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Peju Province Winery—Rutherford Estate Vineyard
Tony and Herta Peju established their winery in 1982 with the purchase of this 30-acre site adjacent to the Napa River. This site is part of the Rutherford Dust Napa River Restoration project. Visit www.peju.com.

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Pine Ridge Winery
This 182-acre site includes steep terraced hillsides which are managed with cover crops to minimize soil erosion. Visit www.pineridgewinery.com.

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Terraced vineyards of Pine Ridge Winery

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Robert Mondavi Winery

Wappo Hill Vineyard
This 340-acre site borders the Napa River, with Chase Creek bisecting the vineyards. Invasive, non-native plants have been removed from the river corridor and native plants installed. This site is part of the Oakville to Oak Knoll Napa River Restoration Plan.

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Napa River riparian corridor next to
Wappo Hill Vineyard

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Salvestrin Wine Company

Estate Vineyard
This 26-acre site sits on St. Helena’s Main Street, where the Salvestrin family has grown grapes since 1932. The valley floor location and well-drained soils enable manager Rich Salvestrin to maintain natural sheetflow over the cover-cropped vineyard. Visit www.salvestrinwinery.com.

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Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars
Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars was founded in 1970 by well-known winemaker Warren Winiarski. Visit www.cask23.com.

Fay & Stags' Leap Vineyards
Chase Creek runs through the west side of this 102-acre vineyard. The creek and drainage system are closely monitored and managed to reduce erosion and fine sediment runoff.

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Blue oaks, on a hillside in the Stags Leap
District, are highly resistant to drought

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Sterling Vineyards

Wildwood Vineyard
Conn Creek runs adjacent to this 78-acre site. As part of their farm plan, they are working with the Fish Friendly Farming Program on an invasive plant removal and revegetation plan for the riparian corridor along Conn Creek.

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Tres Sabores Winery
Owner and winemaker Julie Johnson oversees a 10-acre organic vineyard on a 35-acre site. The hilly uplands are being managed for native wildlife habitat. Visit www.tressabores.com.

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Vine Hill Ranch
Of the 187 acres of this property, 113 acres are wildland forest. Located on a hillside, the 71-acre Vine Hill Ranch vineyard has a drainage system that reduces erosion and sedimentation risk to the adjoining creeks: Kelham and Hopper Creeks.

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